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High endemicity of alveolar echinococcosis in Yili Prefecture, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the People’s Republic of China: infection status in different ethnic communities and in small mammals

Guo, Baoping; Zhang, Zhuangzhi; Guo, Yongzhong; Guo, Gang; Wang, Haiyan; Ma, Jianjun; Chen, Ronggui; Zheng, Xueting; Bao, Jianling; He, Li; Wang, Tian; Qi, Wenjing; Tian, Mengxiao; Wang, Junwei; Zhou, Canlin; Giraudoux, Patrick; Marston, Christopher G. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0002-2070-2187; McManus, Donald P.; Zhang, Wenbao; Li, Jun. 2021 High endemicity of alveolar echinococcosis in Yili Prefecture, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the People’s Republic of China: infection status in different ethnic communities and in small mammals. PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases, 15 (1), e0008891. 17, pp. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008891

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Abstract/Summary

Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) is a neglected zoonosis caused by the larval stage of the fox/dog tapeworm Echinococcus multilocularis. In this study, we collected data on 286 AE cases reported from Yili Prefecture, Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the People’s Republic of China from 1989 to 2015 with an annual incidence (AI) of 0.41/100,000. Among the patients, 73.08% were diagnosed in the last 11 years. The incidence (0.51–1.22 cases/100,000 residents) was higher in the high-altitude mountainous areas than those in low level areas (0.19–0.29/100,000 residents). In term of ethnic group, the AI of AE in Mongolian (2.06/100,000 residents) and Kazak (0.93/100,000) groups had higher incidence than the other ethnic groups, indicating sheep-farming activity is a risk for infection given that sheep farming is mainly practiced by these two groups in the prefecture. A total of 1411 small mammals were captured with 9.14% infected with E. multilocularis metacestodes. Microtus obscurus was the dominant species captured in the mountainous pasture areas with 15.01% infection rate, whereas Mus musculus and Apodemus sylvaticus were the dominant small mammals in the low altitude areas. Only 0.40% of A. sylvaticus were infected with E. multilocularis. These findings show that Yili Prefecture is a highly endemic area for AE and that the high-altitude pasture areas favorable for M. obscurus may play an important role in its transmission in this region.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0008891
UKCEH and CEH Sections/Science Areas: Soils and Land Use (Science Area 2017-)
ISSN: 1935-2727
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: Open Access paper - full text available via Official URL link.
NORA Subject Terms: Health
Biology and Microbiology
Date made live: 19 Feb 2021 11:43 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/529685

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