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An analysis of hand pump boreholes functionality in Malawi

Mkandawire, T.; Mwathunga, E.; MacDonald, A.M. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-6636-1499; Bonsor, H.; Banda, S.; Mleta, P.; Jumbo, S.; Ward, J.; Lapworth, D. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-7838-7960; Chavula, G.; Gwengweya, G.; Whaley, L.; Lark, R.M.. 2020 An analysis of hand pump boreholes functionality in Malawi. Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, Parts A/B/C, 118-119, 102897. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pce.2020.102897

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Abstract/Summary

A survey on the functionality of boreholes equipped with hand pumps was undertaken in five districts in Malawi in 2016. The survey aimed at developing a robust evidence-base of the performance of hand pump boreholes by applying a tiered assessment of functionality: (1) working at the time of survey (2) producing the design yield of the borehole; (3) working for >11 months per year and (4) delivering water quality requirements from the World Health Organisation (WHO). This information would guide sustainable future investments in water and sanitation projects. A stratified two-stage random sampling strategy was adopted. The results from the survey indicate that 74% of hand pump boreholes (HPBs) were working at the time of survey; 66% of HPBs passed the design yield of 10 L per minute; 55% met the design yield and also experienced less than one month downtime within a year. Only 43% of HPBs met all the functionality requirements including WHOguidelines for drinking water quality. The survey also assessed the village-level Water Management Arrangements at each water point. Results indicate that the majority of the Water Management Arrangements (86%) are functional or highly functional. The initial exploration of the data shows no simple relationship between the physical functionality and Water Management Arrangements.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.pce.2020.102897
ISSN: 14747065
Date made live: 29 Sep 2020 09:15 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/528560

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