nerc.ac.uk

Earth tectonics as seen by GOCE - Enhanced satellite gravity gradient imaging

Ebbing, Jörg; Haas, Peter; Ferraccioli, Fausto; Pappa, Folker; Szwillus, Wolfgang; Bouman, Johannes. 2018 Earth tectonics as seen by GOCE - Enhanced satellite gravity gradient imaging. Scientific Reports, 8 (16356). 9, pp. https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-34733-9

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img]
Preview
Text (Open Access)
This article is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License, which permits use, sharing, adaptation, distribution and reproduction in any medium or format, as long as you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The images or other third party material in this article are included in the article’s Creative Commons license, unless indicated otherwise in a credit line to the material. If material is not included in the article’s Creative Commons license and your intended use is not permitted by statutory regulation or exceeds the permitted use, you will need to obtain permission directly from the copyright holder. To view a copy of this license, visit http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/. © The Author(s) 2018
10.1038_s41598-018-34733-9.pdf - Published Version

Download (4MB) | Preview

Abstract/Summary

Curvature components derived from satellite gravity gradients provide new global views of Earth’s structure. The satellite gravity gradients are based on the GOCE satellite mission and we illustrate by curvature images how the Earth is seen differently compared to seismic imaging. Tectonic domains with similar seismic characteristic can exhibit distinct differences in satellite gravity gradients maps, which points to differences in the lithospheric build-up. This is particularly apparent for the cratonic regions of the Earth. The comparisons demonstrate that the combination of seismological, and satellite gravity gradient imaging has significant potential to enhance our knowledge of Earth’s structure. In remote frontiers like the Antarctic continent, where even basic knowledge of lithospheric scale features remains incomplete, the curvature images help unveil the heterogeneity in lithospheric structure, e.g. between the composite East Antarctic Craton and the West Antarctic Rift System.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1038/s41598-018-34733-9
ISSN: 20452322
Date made live: 05 Nov 2018 15:08 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/521435

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

Downloads for past 30 days

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...