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Presence and consequences of coexisting methane gas with hydrate under two phase water-hydrate stability conditions

Sahoo, Sourav K.; Marin Moreno, Héctor; North, Laurence J.; Falcon Suarez, Ismael; Madhusudhan, Bangalore N.; Best, Angus I.; Minshull, Tim A.. 2018 Presence and consequences of coexisting methane gas with hydrate under two phase water-hydrate stability conditions. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth, 123 (5). 3377-3390. https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JB015598

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Abstract/Summary

Methane hydrate saturation estimates from remote geophysical data and borehole logs are needed to assess the role of hydrates in climate change, continental slope stability, and energy resource potential. Here, we present laboratory hydrate formation/dissociation experiments in which we determined the methane hydrate content independently from pore pressure and temperature, and from electrical resistivity. Using these laboratory experiments, we demonstrate that hydrate formation does not take up all the methane gas or water even if the system is under two phase water‐hydrate stability conditions and gas is well distributed in the sample. The experiment started with methane gas and water saturations of 16.5% and 83.5% respectively; during the experiment, hydrate saturation proceeded up to 26% along with 12% gas and 62% water remaining in the system. The co‐existence of hydrate and gas is one possible explanation for discrepancies between estimates of hydrate saturation from electrical and acoustic methods. We suggest that an important mechanism for this co‐existence is the formation of a hydrate film enveloping methane gas bubbles, trapping the remaining gas inside.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1029/2018JB015598
ISSN: 21699313
Date made live: 17 May 2018 14:19 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/520099

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