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Benthic controls of resuspension in UK shelf seas: implications for resuspension frequency

Thompson, C.E.L.; Williams, M.E.; Amoudry, L.; Hull, T.; Reynolds, S.; Panton, D.; Fones, G.R.. 2017 Benthic controls of resuspension in UK shelf seas: implications for resuspension frequency. Continental Shelf Research. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csr.2017.12.005 (In Press)

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© 2017 Elsevier B.V. This is the author’s version of a work that was accepted for publication in Continental Shelf Research. Changes resulting from the publishing process, such as peer review, editing, corrections, structural formatting, and other quality control mechanisms may not be reflected in this document. Changes may have been made to this work since it was submitted for publication. A definitive version was/will be published in Continental Shelf Research
ResuspensionPaper_Final.docx - Accepted Version
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Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives 4.0.

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Abstract/Summary

In situ measurements and ship-based resuspension experiments using annular flumes are used to determine sediment stability and critical erosion thresholds for four sites with significantly different sediment characteristics, located in the Celtic Sea at water depths of 100 m. Seasonal and spatial variability of sediment characteristics and erodability is examined, and found to be the result of changes in percentage of organic carbon in the surface sediments (R2 = 0.82) and bulk density (R2 = 0.73) respectively when individual characteristic bed parameters are considered. Principal component analysis and linear regression analysis are used to determine a predictive model for erosion threshold in the Celtic Sea (R2 = 0.99), based on grain size, sorting, kurtosis, bulk density, porosity, percentage fines, organic carbon content and chlorophyll a concentration. Physical sediment characteristics were found to be more significant controls of bed stability than biological factors. Local hydrodynamic conditions are used to determine the likelihood and frequency of resuspension given these critical erosion thresholds. Resuspension is driven by tidal currents, and is common year-round, leading to a constant re-working of bed sediments in particular at the muddier sites. This is confirmed by in situ measurements of suspended sediment concentration.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.csr.2017.12.005
ISSN: 0278-4343
Date made live: 11 Dec 2017 14:01 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/518639

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