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Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils

Smith, P.; Cotrufo, M.F.; Rumpel, C.; Paustian, K.; Kuikman, P.J.; Elliott, J.A.; McDowell, R.; Griffiths, R.I.; Asakawa, S.; Bustamante, M.; House, J.I.; Sobocka, J.; Harper, R.; Pan, G.; West, P.C.; Gerber, J.S.; Clark, J.M.; Adhya, T. ; Scholes, R.J.; Scholes, M.C.. 2015 Biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity as key drivers of ecosystem services provided by soils. SOIL, 1 (2). 665-685. https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-1-665-2015

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Abstract/Summary

Soils play a pivotal role in major global biogeochemical cycles (carbon, nutrient, and water), while hosting the largest diversity of organisms on land. Because of this, soils deliver fundamental ecosystem services, and management to change a soil process in support of one ecosystem service can either provide co-benefits to other services or result in trade-offs. In this critical review, we report the state-of-the-art understanding concerning the biogeochemical cycles and biodiversity in soil, and relate these to the provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural ecosystem services which they underpin. We then outline key knowledge gaps and research challenges, before providing recommendations for management activities to support the continued delivery of ecosystem services from soils. We conclude that, although soils are complex, there are still knowledge gaps, and fundamental research is still needed to better understand the relationships between different facets of soils and the array of ecosystem services they underpin, enough is known to implement best practices now. There is a tendency among soil scientists to dwell on the complexity and knowledge gaps rather than to focus on what we do know and how this knowledge can be put to use to improve the delivery of ecosystem services. A significant challenge is to find effective ways to share knowledge with soil managers and policy makers so that best management can be implemented. A key element of this knowledge exchange must be to raise awareness of the ecosystems services underpinned by soils and thus the natural capital they provide. We know enough to start moving in the right direction while we conduct research to fill in our knowledge gaps. The lasting legacy of the International Year of Soils in 2015 should be for soil scientists to work together with policy makers and land managers to put soils at the centre of environmental policy making and land management decisions.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.5194/soil-1-665-2015
CEH Sections/Science Areas: Acreman
ISSN: 2199-3971
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: Open Access paper - full text available via Official URL link.
NORA Subject Terms: Agriculture and Soil Science
Date made live: 03 Feb 2016 13:40 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/512457

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