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Evidence of localised gas propagation pathways in a field-scale bentonite engineered barrier system: results from three gas injection tests in the large scale gas injection test (Lasgit)

Cuss, R.J.; Harrington, J.F.; Noy, D.J.; Graham, C.C.; Sellin, P.. 2014 Evidence of localised gas propagation pathways in a field-scale bentonite engineered barrier system: results from three gas injection tests in the large scale gas injection test (Lasgit). Applied Clay Science, 102. 81-92. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clay.2014.10.014

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Abstract/Summary

Three gas injection tests have been conducted during a large scale gas injection test (Lasgit) performed at the Äspö Hard Rock Laboratory, Sweden. Lasgit is a full-scale experiment based on the Swedish KBS-3 repository concept, examining the processes controlling gas and water flow in highly water-saturated compact buffer bentonite. Three preliminary gas injection tests have been performed. The first two tests were conducted in the lower array of injection filters (FL903). Both of these tests showed similar behaviour that corresponded with laboratory observations. The third gas test was conducted in an upper array filter (FU910), which gave a subtly dissimilar response at major gas entry with an initial pressure drop followed by a secondary gas peak pressure. Lasgit has confirmed the coupling between gas, stress and pore-water pressure for flow before and after major gas entry at the field scale. All observations suggest mechanisms of pathway propagation and dilatancy predominate. In all three gas tests the propagation was through localised features that tended to exploit the interface between the copper canister and the bentonite buffer. Considerable evidence exists for the development of a highly-dynamic, tortuous network of pressure induced pathways which evolves both temporally and geospatially within the clay, opening and closing probably due to local changes in gas pressure and or effective stress.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clay.2014.10.014
ISSN: 01691317
Date made live: 23 Sep 2015 14:29 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/511852

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