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Framing scale in participatory biodiversity management may contribute to more sustainable solutions

Young, Juliette C.; Jordan, Andrew; Searle, Kate R.; Butler, Adam; Simmons, Peter; Watt, Allan D.. 2013 Framing scale in participatory biodiversity management may contribute to more sustainable solutions. Conservation Letters , 28 (2). 100-109. https://doi.org/10.1111/conl.12012

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Abstract/Summary

There is general acceptance that biodiversity management should be adapted to ecological scale but only recently has the precise role of scale in participatory biodiversity governance begun to be explored. We investigated stakeholder perceptions in three case studies of biodiversity management planning to understand the effect of framing a management response according to the ecological and social scale of the problem on (i) participatory processes and (ii) their social and ecological outcomes. Perceptions of success were highest in the case study where stakeholder involvement reflected the perceived ecological scale of the problem. Other factors contributing to successful outcomes were identified, including effective boundary spanning and mutual recognition of conservation conflicts. Failure to take the latter into account, and to align management responses with socioecological scale, may jeopardize long-term sustainability of biodiversity.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1111/conl.12012
CEH Sections/Science Areas: Watt
ISSN: 1755-263X
Additional Keywords: Biodiversity, comanagement, cross-scale interactions, human-environment systems, Natura 2000, public participation, scale, Scotland, Special Area of Conservation
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Date made live: 10 Mar 2014 12:17 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/505242

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