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Use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration

Guly, H.R.. 2013 Use and abuse of alcohol and other drugs during the heroic age of Antarctic exploration. History of Psychiatry, 24 (1). 94-105. https://doi.org/10.1177/0957154X12450139

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Abstract/Summary

During the heroic age of Antarctic exploration, there was much discussion on the role of alcohol. The explorers expected to be able to consume alcohol, and the expeditions were supported by companies producing alcoholic beverages that used the Antarctic connection in their advertising. On the other side, it was said (incorrectly) than Fridjof Nansen, perhaps the most famous of the Arctic explorers, had taken no alcohol and this was used in the arguments against alcohol by the temperance movement. In general, alcohol consumption was low but it was felt that alcohol played an important role in maintaining the psychological welfare of the participants. A number of them had alcohol problems, and participation in an expedition was thought to be of benefit in that it would remove the temptation to consume alcohol. However, there were episodes of drunkenness on the ships and in the Antarctic. Cocaine was taken as one of a number of tonics but only one explorer is thought to have abused drugs, though another is said to have done so.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): https://doi.org/10.1177/0957154X12450139
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Other
ISSN: 0957-154X
Additional Keywords: alcohol, alcoholism, Antarctic, drug abuse, exploration
NORA Subject Terms: Health
Date made live: 17 May 2013 07:56 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/501963

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