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The phylogeographical clade trade: tracing the impact of human-mediated dispersal on the colonization of northern Europe by the oak gallwasp Andricus kollari

Stone, Graham N.; Challis, Richard J.; Atkinson, Rachel J.; Csoka, Gyorgy; Hayward, Alex; Melika, George; Mutun, Serap; Preuss, Sonja; Rokas, Antonis; Sadeghi, Ebrahim; Schonrogge, Karsten. 2007 The phylogeographical clade trade: tracing the impact of human-mediated dispersal on the colonization of northern Europe by the oak gallwasp Andricus kollari. Molecular Ecology, 16. 2768-2781. 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03348.x

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Abstract/Summary

Human dispersal of organisms is an important process modifying natural patterns of biodiversity. Such dispersal generates new patterns of genetic diversity that overlie natural phylogeographical signatures, allowing discrimination between alternative dispersal mechanisms. Here we use allele frequency and DNA sequence data to distinguish between alternative scenarios (unassisted range expansion and long range introduction) for the colonization of northern Europe by an oak-feeding gallwasp, Andricus kollari. Native to Mediterranean latitudes from Portugal to Iran, this species became established in northern Europe following human introduction of a host plant, the Turkey oak Quercus cerris. Colonization of northern Europe is possible through three alternative routes: (i) unassisted range expansion from natural populations in the Iberian Peninsula; (ii) unassisted range expansion from natural populations in Italy and Hungary; or (iii) descent from populations imported to the UK as trade goods from the eastern Mediterranean in the 1830s. We show that while populations in France were colonized from sources in Italy and Hungary, populations in the UK and neighbouring parts of coastal northern Europe encompass allozyme and sequence variation absent from the known native range. Further, these populations show demographic signatures expected for large stable populations, rather than signatures of rapid population growth from small numbers of founders. The extent and spatial distribution of genetic diversity in the UK suggests that these A. kollari populations are derived from introductions of large numbers of individuals from each of two genetically divergent centres of diversity in the eastern Mediterranean. The strong spatial patterning in genetic diversity observed between different regions of northern Europe, and between sites in the UK, is compatible with leptokurtic models of population establishment.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1111/j.1365-294X.2007.03348.x
Programmes: CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biodiversity > BD01 Conservation and Restoration of Biodiversity > BD01.1 Distributions and abundance of taxa
CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biodiversity > BD02 An Integrated Framework for the Sustainable Management of Biological Introductions - Alien Species and Emerging Diseases > BD02.1 Pathways of entry and traits of successful biological introductions
CEH Sections: Hails
ISSN: 0962-1083
Additional Keywords: molecular pylogeography, dispersal, biological invasions, Andricus kollari, cynipid, introduction, invasion, lifecycle, oak
NORA Subject Terms: Zoology
Biology and Microbiology
Ecology and Environment
Date made live: 20 Sep 2007 10:58
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/947

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