nerc.ac.uk

Effects of dry and wet N deposition on vegetation and biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog

van Zetten, Elleke; de Lange, Irene; Sheppard, Lucy J.; Leith, Ian D.; Crossley, Alan; van den Berg, Leon; Roelofs, Jan. 2006 Effects of dry and wet N deposition on vegetation and biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic bog. In: Caper 2006. Centre for Ecology and Hydrology, 9, 1pp.

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img]
Preview
Text
N008327AB.pdf.pdf

Download (31Kb)

Abstract/Summary

It has repeatedly been shown that increased nitrogen (N) deposition results in dramatic shifts in vegetation composition. The sources of N-deposition vary from agriculture (mainly NH3 and NH4) to industry and traffic (mainly NOx). Effects of these different N forms on the vegetation and biogeochemistry of an ombrotrophic peat bog, Whim Moss (~15km southwest of Edinburgh), have been investigated since April 2002, by employing an automate N manipulation system. This field experiment, uniquely, offers the possibility to investigate the effects of the different N forms at the same site and at application rates and deposition scenarios simulating natural variation in rainfall. Within the manipulation system there are two N manipulations: Dry, where gaseous NH3 is released over a 60 m transect at concentrations that simulate a 100,000 bird poultry unit (0.4-200 μg m-3), and Wet, as soluble nitrate or ammonium, covering the full range of UK wet N-deposition (8 – 64 kg N ha-1yr-1). The effects of dry N deposition on the vegetation and biogeochemistry at different distances from the NH3 source have been analysed. In the wet N deposition experiment, 5 treatments were followed, ranging from 8-64 kg N ha-1yr-1 and differing in N form as either oxidised or reduced N. Samples of soil water were obtained using mini-rhizon samplers and were tested for pH, NH4, NO3, P and base cations. Young (1 year old) shoots of Calluna vulgaris L. (Hull), Erica tetralix L. and Sphagnum capillifolium Ehrh. (Hedw.) were harvested and tested for chlorophyll concentrations, aminoacids and P and base cation concentrations in acid digests. The preliminary results show differences between treatment N forms and N doses and along the NH3 gradient. In this presentation we will focus on the plant responses to the changes in the biochemistry. CAPER Conference

Item Type: Publication - Book Section
Programmes: CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biogeochemistry
CEH Sections: Billett
NORA Subject Terms: Atmospheric Sciences
Date made live: 15 Oct 2009 09:31
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/8327

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...