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Relatedness and body size influence territorial behaviour in Salmo salar juveniles in the wild

Fernandes, W.P.A.; Griffiths, S.W.; Ibbotson, A.T.; Riley, W.D.. 2017 Relatedness and body size influence territorial behaviour in Salmo salar juveniles in the wild. Fisheries Management and Ecology, 24 (4). 347-351. 10.1111/fme.12234

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Abstract/Summary

Wild Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar L., juveniles defend territories to enable exclusive access to food resources, and kin selection benefits may be accrued where territorial boundaries of relatives overlap. This study explored space sharing events between pairs of sibling and non-sibling fish as a measure of territoriality and resource competition in a small chalk stream using passive integrated transponder (PIT) technology. The time period between fish detections in a shared space was closer between pairs of siblings (sibling pairs mean = 60.48 ± 51.84 min; non-sibling pairs mean = 348.8 ±65.94 min). These results suggest that the territorial boundaries of related fish often overlap, thus increasing the likelihood of siblings accruing kin selection benefits. The findings from this study also suggest that outcomes of competitive interactions among dominant and subordinate fish are less pronounced when fish are related.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1111/fme.12234
CEH Sections: Unaffiliated
ISSN: 0969-997X
Additional Keywords: Atlantic salmon, competition, dominance, kin selection, kinship, tagging
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Date made live: 25 Jul 2017 10:04 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/517376

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