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Do fish go with the flow? The effects of periodic and episodic flow pulses on 0+ fish biomass in a constrained lowland river

Walton, S.E.; Nunn, A.D.; Probst, W.N.; Bolland, J.D.; Acreman, M.; Cowx, I.G.. 2017 Do fish go with the flow? The effects of periodic and episodic flow pulses on 0+ fish biomass in a constrained lowland river. Ecohydrology, 10 (1), e1777. 14, pp. 10.1002/eco.1777

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Abstract/Summary

The hydrological regime is a significant driver of fish population dynamics in rivers, but there is a dearth of information regarding the mechanisms behind its effects on temperate species, especially non-salmonids. This study investigated the effects of periodic and episodic flow pulses on 0+ fish biomass in a constrained lowland river. De-seasonalized cross-correlation analysis was used to examine time-lagged correlations in episodic signals, in isolation of seasonal periodicity, to identify the responses and response timings of 0+ fish production to abiotic variables, and whether apparent “pulse-depletions” in biomass occur instantaneously (e.g., due to fish displacement during high pulses) or after a time lag. As anticipated, 0+ fish biomass was highest during periods of low discharge and high temperatures in summer, but cross-correlation analysis revealed a negative impact of high pulses on 0+ fish biomass with a lag of 7 months. There was no evidence for an instantaneous pulse-depletion effect of discharge on 0+ fish biomass, suggesting that the indirect effects of high pulses, such as habitat or food-web modifications, are more influential.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1002/eco.1777
CEH Sections: Acreman
ISSN: 1936-0584
Additional Keywords: 0+ fish biomass, cross-correlation, fish production, hydroecology, river discharge, time lag
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Zoology
Date made live: 05 Apr 2017 13:34 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/516801

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