nerc.ac.uk

Plant functional connectivity - integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal

Auffret, Alistair G.; Rico, Yessica; Bullock, James M.; Hooftman, Danny A.P.; Pakeman, Robin J.; Soons, Merel B.; Suárez-Esteban, Alberto; Traveset, Anna; Wagner, Helene H.; Cousins, Sara A.O.. 2017 Plant functional connectivity - integrating landscape structure and effective dispersal. Journal of Ecology. 10.1111/1365-2745.12742

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img] Text
Auffret-2017-Plant functional connectivity – i.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to NORA staff only

Download (290kB)

Abstract/Summary

1. Dispersal is essential for species to survive the threats of habitat destruction and climate change. Combining descriptions of dispersal ability with those of landscape structure, the concept of functional connectivity has been popular for understanding and predicting species’ spatial responses to environmental change. 2. Following recent advances, the functional connectivity concept is now able to move beyond landscape structure to consider more explicitly how other external factors such as climate and resources affect species movement. We argue that these factors, in addition to a consideration of the complete dispersal process, are critical for an accurate understanding of functional connectivity for plant species in response to environmental change. 3. We use recent advances in dispersal, landscape and molecular ecology to describe how a range of external factors can influence effective dispersal in plant species, and how the resulting functional connectivity can be assessed. 4. Synthesis. We define plant functional connectivity as the effective dispersal of propagules or pollen among habitat patches in a landscape. Plant functional connectivity is determined by a combination of landscape structure, interactions between plant, environment and dispersal vectors, and the successful establishment of individuals. We hope that this consolidation of recent research will help focus future connectivity research and conservation.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1111/1365-2745.12742
CEH Sections: CEH fellows
Pywell
ISSN: 0022-0477
Additional Keywords: biodiversity conservation, climate change, gene flow, habitat fragmentation, landscape ecology, landscape genetics, pollen dispersal, pollination, seed dispersal
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Date made live: 03 Apr 2017 16:28 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/516760

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

Downloads for past 30 days

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...