nerc.ac.uk

Inter-annual variability of soil respiration in wet shrublands: do plants modulate its sensitivity to climate?

Dominguez, Maria T.; Smith, Andrew R.; Reinsch, Sabine; Emmett, Bridget A.. 2017 Inter-annual variability of soil respiration in wet shrublands: do plants modulate its sensitivity to climate? Ecosystems, 20 (4). 796-812. 10.1007/s10021-016-0062-3

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img] Text
N515293PP.pdf - Accepted Version
Restricted to NORA staff only until 14 November 2017.

Download (1MB)

Abstract/Summary

Understanding the response of soil respiration to climate variability is critical to formulate realistic predictions of future carbon (C) fluxes under different climate change scenarios. There is growing evidence that the influence of long-term climate variability in C fluxes from terrestrial ecosystems is modulated by adjustments in the aboveground–belowground links. Here, we studied the inter-annual variability in soil respiration from a wet shrubland going through successional change in North Wales (UK) during 13 years. We hypothesised that the decline in plant productivity observed over a decade would result in a decrease in the apparent sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature, and that rainfall variability would explain a significant fraction of the inter-annual variability in plant productivity, and consequently, in soil respiration, due to excess-water constraining nutrient availability for plants. As hypothesised, there were parallel decreases between plant productivity and annual and summer CO2 emissions over the 13-year period. Soil temperatures did not follow a similar trend, which resulted in a decline in the apparent sensitivity of soil respiration to soil temperature (apparent Q10 values decreased from 9.4 to 2.8). Contrary to our second hypothesis, summer maximum air temperature rather than rainfall was the climate variable with the greatest influence on aboveground biomass and annual cumulative respiration. Since summer air temperature and rainfall were positively associated, the greatest annual respiration values were recorded during years of high rainfall. The results suggest that adjustments in plant productivity might have a critical role in determining the long-term-sensitivity of soil respiration to changing climate conditions.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1007/s10021-016-0062-3
CEH Sections: Emmett
ISSN: 1432-9840
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: View-only version of published paper is available via Related URL link.
Additional Keywords: plant productivity, Q10, soil C, climate change, drought, heathland, Calluna vulgaris
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Agriculture and Soil Science
Related URLs:
Date made live: 01 Dec 2016 12:47 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/515293

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

Downloads for past 30 days

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...