nerc.ac.uk

Predicting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioavailability to mammals from incidentally ingested soils using partitioning and fugacity

James, Kyle; Peters, Rachel E.; Cave, Mark R.; Wickstrom, Mark; Lamb, Eric G.; Siciliano, Steven D.. 2016 Predicting polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon bioavailability to mammals from incidentally ingested soils using partitioning and fugacity. Environmental Science & Technology, 50 (3). 1338-1346. 10.1021/acs.est.5b05317

Full text not available from this repository. (Request a copy)

Abstract/Summary

Soil and dust ingestion is one of the major human exposure pathways to contaminated soil; however, pollutant transfer from ingested substances to humans cannot currently be confidently predicted. Soil polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) bioavailability is likely dependent upon properties linked to chemical potential and partitioning such as fugacity, fugacity capacity, soil organic carbon, and partitioning to simulated intestinal fluids. We estimated the oral PAH bioavailability of 19 historically contaminated soils fed to juvenile swine. Between soils, PAH blood content, with the exception of benzo(a)pyrene, was not linked to fugacity. In contrast, between individual PAHs, using partitioning explained PAH blood content (area under the curve = 0.47 log fugacity + 0.34, r2 = 0.68, p < 0.005, n = 14). Soil fugacity capacity predicts PAH soil concentration with an average slope of 0.30 (μg PAH g–1 soil) Pa–1 and r2’s of 0.61–0.73. Because PAH blood content was independent of soil concentration, soil fugacity correlated to PAH bioavailability via soil fugacity’s link to soil concentration. In conclusion, we can use fugacity to explain PAH uptake from a soil into blood. However, something other than partitioning is critical to explain the differences in PAH uptake into blood between soils.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1021/acs.est.5b05317
ISSN: 0013-936X
Date made live: 08 Jun 2016 08:55 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/513769

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

Downloads for past 30 days

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...