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Aligning MIS5 proxy records from Lake Ohrid (FYROM) with independently dated Mediterranean archives: implications for core chronology

Zanchetta, G.; Regattieri, E.; Giaccio, B.; Wagner, B.; Sulpizio, R.; Francke, A.; Vogel, L. H.; Sadori, L.; Masi, A.; Sinopoli, G.; Lacey, J.H.; Leng, M.L.; Leicher, N.. 2015 Aligning MIS5 proxy records from Lake Ohrid (FYROM) with independently dated Mediterranean archives: implications for core chronology. Biogeosciences Discussions, 12 (20). 16979-17007. 10.5194/bgd-12-16979-2015

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Abstract/Summary

The DEEP site sediment sequence obtained during the ICDP SCOPSCO project at Lake Ohrid was dated using tephrostratigraphic information, cyclostratigraphy, and orbital tuning through marine isotope record. Although this approach is suitable for the generation of a general chronological framework of the long succession, it is insufficient to resolve more detailed paleoclimatological questions, such as leads and lags of climate events between marine and terrestrial records or between different regions. In this paper, we demonstrate how the use of different tie points can affect cyclostratigraphy and orbital tuning for the period between ca. 140 and 70 ka and how the results can be correlated with directly/indirectly radiometrically-dated Mediterranean marine and continental proxy records. The alternative age model obtained shows consistent differences with that proposed by Francke et al. (2015) for the same interval, in particular at the level of the MIS6-5e transition. According to this age model, different proxies from the DEEP site sediment record support an increase of temperatures between glacial to interglacial conditions, which is almost synchronous with a rapid increase in sea surface temperature observed in the western Mediterranean. The results show how important a detailed study of independent chronological tie points is for synchronizing different records and to highlight asynchronisms of climate events.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.5194/bgd-12-16979-2015
ISSN: 1810-6285
Date made live: 02 Nov 2015 14:08 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/512125

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