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Cortisol can increase the susceptibility of brown trout, Salmo trutta L., to disease without reducing the white blood cell count

Pickering, A.D.; Pottinger, T.G.. 1985 Cortisol can increase the susceptibility of brown trout, Salmo trutta L., to disease without reducing the white blood cell count. Journal of Fish Biology, 27 (5). 611-619. 10.1111/j.1095-8649.1985.tb03206.x

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Abstract/Summary

Chronic elevation of plasma cortisol levels in the brown trout by means of slow-release, intraperitoneal implants increased the susceptibility of the fish to disease. Elevation from a mean basal level of 1–4 ng/ml to ∼10 ng/ml for a period of 2–4 weeks was sufficient to increase the mortality rate due to furunculosis, Saprolegnia infection and bacterial fin-rot. This level of plasma cortisol is well within that capable of being produced by the fish under conditions of chronic stress. The increase in susceptibility to disease was not accompanied by a reduction in the number of circulating lymphocytes and it is suggested that under certain conditions chronically-elevated cortisol levels may be more sensitive, predictive indicators of reduced disease-resistance than are changes in blood cell counts.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1111/j.1095-8649.1985.tb03206.x
CEH Sections: _ Pre-2000 sections
ISSN: 0022-1112
Additional Keywords: Brown trout, Salmo trutta, stress, cortisol, lymphocyte, thrombocyte, erythrocyte, neutrophil, implantation, temperature, furunculosis, Saprolegnia, immunosuppression
NORA Subject Terms: Zoology
Biology and Microbiology
Date made live: 21 Sep 2015 13:34 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/511192

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