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The effects of lead sources on oral bioaccessibility in soil and implications for contaminated land risk management

Palmer, Sherry; McIlwaine, Rebekka; Ofterdinger, Ulrich; Cox, Siobhan F.; McKinley, Jennifer M.; Doherty, Rory; Wragg, Joanna; Cave, Mark. 2015 The effects of lead sources on oral bioaccessibility in soil and implications for contaminated land risk management. Environmental Pollution, 198. 161-171. 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.01.004

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Abstract/Summary

Lead (Pb) is a non-threshold toxin capable of inducing toxic effects at any blood level but availability of soil screening criteria for assessing potential health risks is limited. The oral bioaccessibility of Pb in 163 soil samples was attributed to sources through solubility estimation and domain identification. Samples were extracted following the Unified BARGE Method. Urban, mineralisation, peat and granite domains accounted for elevated Pb concentrations compared to rural samples. High Pb solubility explained moderate-high gastric (G) bioaccessible fractions throughout the study area. Higher maximum G concentrations were measured in urban (97.6 mg kg−1) and mineralisation (199.8 mg kg−1) domains. Higher average G concentrations occurred in mineralisation (36.4 mg kg−1) and granite (36.0 mg kg−1) domains. Findings suggest diffuse anthropogenic and widespread geogenic contamination could be capable of presenting health risks, having implications for land management decisions in jurisdictions where guidance advises these forms of pollution should not be regarded as contaminated land.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.envpol.2015.01.004
ISSN: 02697491
Date made live: 08 May 2015 13:37 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/510763

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