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Observing the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation yields a decade of inevitable surprises

Srokosz, M.A.; Bryden, H.L.. 2015 Observing the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation yields a decade of inevitable surprises. Science, 348 (6241). 1255575. 10.1126/science.1255575

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© 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science This document is the author’s final manuscript version of the journal article following the peer review process. Some differences between this and the publisher’s version may remain. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from this article. The definitive version is available at http://www.sciencemag.org/
Srokosz_Sci_sum_rev2.pdf - Accepted Version

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© 2015 American Association for the Advancement of Science This document is the author’s final manuscript version of the journal article following the peer review process. Some differences between this and the publisher’s version may remain. You are advised to consult the publisher’s version if you wish to cite from this article. The definitive version is available at http://www.sciencemag.org/
Srokosz_Science_rev_ref2.pdf - Accepted Version

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Abstract/Summary

The importance of the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) heat transport for climate is well acknowledged. Climate models predict that the AMOC will slow down under global warming, with substantial impacts, but measurements of ocean circulation have been inadequate to evaluate these predictions. Observations over the past decade have changed that situation, providing a detailed picture of variations in the AMOC. These observations reveal a surprising degree of AMOC variability in terms of the intraannual range, the amplitude and phase of the seasonal cycle, the interannual changes in strength affecting the ocean heat content, and the decline of the AMOC over the decade, both of the latter two exceeding the variations seen in climate models.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1126/science.1255575
ISSN: 0036-8075
NORA Subject Terms: Marine Sciences
Date made live: 19 Jun 2015 10:32 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/510732

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