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Distribution, habitat and trophic ecology of Antarctic squid Kondakovia longimana and Moroteuthis knipovitchi: inferences from predators and stable isotopes

Seco, J.; Roberts, J.; Ceia, F. R.; Baeta, A.; Ramos, J. A.; Paiva, V. H.; Xavier, J. C.. 2016 Distribution, habitat and trophic ecology of Antarctic squid Kondakovia longimana and Moroteuthis knipovitchi: inferences from predators and stable isotopes. Polar Biology, 39 (1). 167-175. 10.1007/s00300-015-1675-2

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This article has been accepted for publication and will be published by Springer in Polar Biology. The final publication is available at link.springer.com. Copyright Springer.
Seco et al - Distribution, habitat and trophic ecology of Antarctic cephalopods.pdf - Accepted Version

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Abstract/Summary

Cephalopods have a key role in the marine environment though knowledge of their distribution and trophic ecology is limited by a lack of observations. This is particularly true for Antarctic species. Toothfish species are key predators of cephalopods and may be viewed as ideal biological samplers of these species. A total of 256 cephalopod lower beaks were identified from the stomachs of Patagonian toothfish (Dissostichus eleginoides) and Antarctic toothfish (Dissostichus mawsoni), captured in fisheries of South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands in the South Atlantic between March and April 2009. Long-armed octopus squid (Kondakovia longimana) and smooth-hooked squid (Moroteuthis knipovitchi) were the main cephalopod prey and both were predated upon wherever toothfish were captured, though this cephalopod species appear to inhabit deeper waters at the South Sandwich Islands than at South Georgia. Measurements of δ13C from beak material indicated a clear segregation of habitat use comparing adult and sub-adult sized K. longimana. Variation in δ15N with size indicated an ontogenetic shift in the diet of cephalopods and also suggested some trophic plasticity among years. This study provides new insights into the private life of some elusive Antarctic cephalopods in an underexplored region of the South Atlantic.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1007/s00300-015-1675-2
Programmes: BAS Programmes > BAS Programmes 2015 > Ecosystems
ISSN: 0722-4060
Additional Keywords: Dissostichus eleginoides, Dissostichus mawsoni, cephalopod, South Sandwich Islands, Southern Ocean, d13C and d15N
Date made live: 31 Mar 2015 08:34 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/510518

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