nerc.ac.uk

Linking regional variation of epibiotic bacterial diversity and trophic ecology in a new species of Kiwaidae (Decapoda, Anomura) from East Scotia Ridge (Antarctica) hydrothermal vents

Zwirglmaier, Katrin; Reid, William D. K.; Heywood, Jane; Sweeting, Christopher J.; Wigham, Benjamin D.; Polunin, Nicholas V.C.; Hawkes, Jeff A.; Connelly, Douglas P.; Pearce, David; Linse, Katrin. 2015 Linking regional variation of epibiotic bacterial diversity and trophic ecology in a new species of Kiwaidae (Decapoda, Anomura) from East Scotia Ridge (Antarctica) hydrothermal vents. MicrobiologyOpen, 4 (1). 136-150. 10.1002/mbo3.227

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img]
Preview
Text (Open Access paper)
mbo3227.pdf - Published Version
Available under License Creative Commons Attribution 4.0.

Download (818kB) | Preview

Abstract/Summary

We analyzed the diversity of bacterial epibionts and trophic ecology of a new species of Kiwa yeti crab discovered at two hydrothermal vent fields (E2 and E9) on the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) in the Southern Ocean using a combination of 454 pyrosequencing, Sanger sequencing, and stable isotope analysis. The Kiwa epibiont communities were dominated by Epsilon- and Gammaproteobacteria. About 454 sequencing of the epibionts on 15 individual Kiwa specimen revealed large regional differences between the two hydrothermal vent fields: at E2, the bacterial community on the Kiwa ventral setae was dominated (up to 75%) by Gammaproteobacteria, whereas at E9 Epsilonproteobacteria dominated (up to 98%). Carbon stable isotope analysis of both Kiwa and the bacterial epibionts also showed distinct differences between E2 and E9 in mean and variability. Both stable isotope and sequence data suggest a dominance of different carbon fixation pathways of the epibiont communities at the two vent fields. At E2, epibionts were putatively fixing carbon via the Calvin-Benson-Bassham and reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle, while at E9 the reverse tricarboxylic acid cycle dominated. Co-varying epibiont diversity and isotope values at E2 and E9 also present further support for the hypothesis that epibionts serve as a food source for Kiwa.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1002/mbo3.227
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Polar Science for Planet Earth (2009 - ) > Ecosystems
BAS Programmes > Polar Science for Planet Earth (2009 - ) > Environmental Change and Evolution
ISSN: 20458827
Additional Keywords: East Scotia Ridge; epibionts; hydrothermal vent; Kiwa sp.; microbial diversity; stable isotopes
Date made live: 18 Dec 2014 10:52 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/509138

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

Downloads for past 30 days

Downloads per month over past year

More statistics for this item...