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Structure and evolution of Cenozoic arc magmatism on the Antarctic Peninsula: a high resolution aeromagnetic perspective

Jordan, T. A.; Neale, R. F.; Leat, P. T.; Vaughan, A. P. M.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Riley, T. R.; Whitehouse, M. J.; Ferraccioli, F.. 2014 Structure and evolution of Cenozoic arc magmatism on the Antarctic Peninsula: a high resolution aeromagnetic perspective. Geophysical Journal International, 198 (3). 1758-1774. 10.1093/gji/ggu233

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Abstract/Summary

The Antarctic Peninsula (AP) consists of a long lived and uniquely well preserved magmatic arc system. The broad tectonic structure of the AP arc is well understood. However, magmatic processes occurring along the arc are only constrained by regional geophysical and relatively sparse geological data. Key questions remain about the timing, volume, and structural controls on magma emplacement. We present new high resolution aeromagnetic data across Adelaide Island, on the western margin of the AP revealing the complex structure of the AP arc/forearc boundary. Using digital enhancement, 2-D modelling and 3-D inversion we constrain the form of the magnetic sources at the arc/forearc boundary. Our interpretation of these magnetic data, guided by geological evidence and new zircon U-Pb dating, suggests significant Palaeogene to Neogene magmatism formed ∼25 per cent of the upper crust in this region (∼7500 km3). Significant structural control on Neogene magma emplacement along the arc/forearc boundary is also revealed. We hypothesize that this Neogene magmatism reflects mantle return flow through a slab window generated by Late Palaeogene cessation of subduction south of Adelaide Island. This mantle process may have affected the final stages of arc magmatism along the AP margin.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1093/gji/ggu233
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Global Science in the Antarctic Context (2005-2009) > Long-Term Monitoring and Survey – Geosciences Division
BAS Programmes > Polar Science for Planet Earth (2009 - ) > Environmental Change and Evolution
ISSN: 0956-540X
Additional Keywords: magnetic anomalies, modelling and interpretations, mantle processes, volcanic arc processes, continental margins, convergences, crustal structure, Antarctica
Date made live: 29 Jul 2014 10:50 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/507947

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