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Two intense decades of 19th century whaling precipitated rapid decline of right whales around New Zealand and east Australia

Carroll, Emma L.; Jackson, Jennifer A.; Paton, David; Smith, Tim D.. 2014 Two intense decades of 19th century whaling precipitated rapid decline of right whales around New Zealand and east Australia. PLoS ONE, 9 (4), e93789. 10.1371/journal.pone.0093789

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Abstract/Summary

Right whales (Eubalaena spp.) were the focus of worldwide whaling activities from the 16th to the 20th century. During the first part of the 19th century, the southern right whale (E. australis) was heavily exploited on whaling grounds around New Zealand (NZ) and east Australia (EA). Here we build upon previous estimates of the total catch of NZ and EA right whales by improving and combining estimates from four different fisheries. Two fisheries have previously been considered: shore-based whaling in bays and ship-based whaling offshore. These were both improved by comparison with primary sources and the American offshore whaling catch record was improved by using a sample of logbooks to produce a more accurate catch record in terms of location and species composition. Two fisheries had not been previously integrated into the NZ and EA catch series: ship-based whaling in bays and whaling in the 20th century. To investigate the previously unaddressed problem of offshore whalers operating in bays, we identified a subset of vessels likely to be operating in bays and read available extant logbooks. This allowed us to estimate the total likely catch from bay-whaling by offshore whalers from the number of vessels seasons and whales killed per season: it ranged from 2,989 to 4,652 whales. The revised total estimate of 53,000 to 58,000 southern right whales killed is a considerable increase on the previous estimate of 26,000, partly because it applies fishery-specific estimates of struck and loss rates. Over 80% of kills were taken between 1830 and 1849, indicating a brief and intensive fishery that resulted in the commercial extinction of southern right whales in NZ and EA in just two decades. This conforms to the global trend of increasingly intense and destructive southern right whale fisheries over time.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1371/journal.pone.0093789
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Polar Science for Planet Earth (2009 - ) > Environmental Change and Evolution
ISSN: 1932-6203
Date made live: 02 Apr 2014 10:02 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/506956

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