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Coastal changes in a mangrove, Puerto Rico (video)

Vane, Christopher. Coastal changes in a mangrove, Puerto Rico (video). 11 February 2013, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3Ne1Iw7Y2Q&list=UU0JCbQti3FlTIzrJGZqzh3Q&index=2 [Output (Electronic)]

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Abstract/Summary

In a video on the BGS YouTube channel, BGS organic geochemist Chris Vane talks about a BGS climate change project looking at the geochemistry and palynology of the 'carbon-rich' sediments deposited by the flora and fauna of the mangrove system at Sebana Seca, on the Caribbean island of Puerto Rico. There are two elements of the project: 1) Biogeochemical cycles: Mangrove peats are one of the main carbon pools in the terrestrial-coastal system. Stabilisation of mangrove peats is desirable as it locks organic carbon in and reduces mineralisation which contributes to atmospheric CO2. However, the storage and accumulation of mangrove peat carbon depends on a number factors including post burial alteration by insects and micro-organisms (bacteria and fungi). This project aims to understand the effects of termites on mangrove organic matter in mangroves. 2) Sea level change: The organic geochemistry of the peat cores tells us about past sea level rise. In modern mangroves, different plants with different chemistries occur at distinct elevation ranges within the intertidal zone, this chemical proxy based approach can then be applied to sediment cores and thus provide a geological context to frame recent relative sea level rise. This project therefore extends our knowledge of past sea level rise from less than 100 years (satellites and tide gauges) to greater than 5000 years.

Item Type: Output (Electronic)
Electronic Identifier / URL / DOI: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K3Ne1Iw7Y2Q&list=UU0JCbQti3FlTIzrJGZqzh3Q&index=2
Date made live: 19 Apr 2013 09:53 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/500609

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