nerc.ac.uk

Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in lake catchments, in river water abstracted for domestic use, and in effluent from domestic sewage treatments works: Diverse opportunities for environmental cycling and human exposure

Pickup, R.W.; Rhodes, G.; Bull, T. J.; Arnott, S.; Sidi-Boumedine, K.; Hurley, M.; Herman-Taylor, J.. 2006 Mycobacterium avium subsp paratuberculosis in lake catchments, in river water abstracted for domestic use, and in effluent from domestic sewage treatments works: Diverse opportunities for environmental cycling and human exposure. Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 72 (6). 4067-4077. 10.1128/AEM.02490-05

Full text not available from this repository.

Abstract/Summary

Mycobacterium avium subsp. paratuberculosis from infected animals enters surface waters and rivers in runoff from contaminated pastures. We studied the River Tywi in South Wales, United Kingdom, whose catchment comprises 1,100 km2 containing more than a million dairy and beef cattle and more than 1.3 million sheep. The River Tywi is abstracted for the domestic water supply. Between August 2002 and April 2003, 48 of 70 (68.8%) twice-weekly river water samples tested positive by IS900 PCR. In river water, the organisms were associated with a suspended solid which was depleted by the water treatment process. Disposal of contaminated slurry back onto the land established a cycle of environmental persistence. A concentrate from 100 liters of finished water tested negative, but 1 of 54 domestic cold water tanks tested positive, indicating the potential for these pathogens to access domestic outlets. In the separate English Lake District region, with hills up to 980 m, tests for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis in the high hill lakes and sediments were usually negative, but streams and sediments became positive lower down the catchment. Sediments from 9 of 10 major lakes receiving inflow from these catchments were positive, with sediment cores indicating deposition over at least 40 to 50 years. Two of 12 monthly 1-liter samples of effluent and a single 100-liter sample from the Ambleside sewage treatment works were positive for M. avium subsp. paratuberculosis. Since Lake Ambleside discharges into Lake Windermere, which is available for domestic supply, there is a potential for these organisms to cycle within human populations.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1128/AEM.02490-05
Programmes: CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biodiversity
CEH Sections: _ Ecological Processes in Freshwater & Soils
ISSN: 0099-2240
Format Availability: Electronic, Print
NORA Subject Terms: Biology and Microbiology
Health
Date made live: 29 Jun 2007 13:55
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/435

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item