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Reduced soil water availability did not protect two competing grassland species from the negative effects of increasing background ozone

Wagg, Serena; Mills, Gina; Hayes, Felicity; Wilkinson, Sally; Cooper, David; Davies, William J.. 2012 Reduced soil water availability did not protect two competing grassland species from the negative effects of increasing background ozone. Environmental Pollution, 165. 91-99. 10.1016/j.envpol.2012.02.010

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Abstract/Summary

Two common (semi-) natural temperate grassland species, Dactylis glomerata and Ranunculus acris, were grown in competition and exposed to two watering regimes: well-watered (WW, 20–40% v/v) and reduced-watered (RW, 7.5–20% v/v) in combination with eight ozone treatments ranging from pre-industrial to predicted 2100 background levels. For both species there was a significant increase in leaf damage with increasing background ozone concentration. RW had no protective effect against increasing levels of ozone-induced senescence/injury. In high ozone, based on measurements of stomatal conductance, we propose that ozone influx into the leaves was not prevented in the RW treatment, in D. glomerata because stomata were a) more widely open than those in less polluted plants and b) were less responsive to drought. Total seasonal above ground biomass was not significantly altered by increased ozone; however, ozone significantly reduced root biomass in both species to differing amounts depending on watering regime.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.envpol.2012.02.010
Programmes: CEH Topics & Objectives 2009 - 2012 > Biogeochemistry
CEH Sections: Emmett
ISSN: 0269-7491
Additional Keywords: background ozone, carbon allocation, climate change, drought, senescence, stomatal conductance, soil moisture deficit, roots
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Agriculture and Soil Science
Meteorology and Climatology
Date made live: 21 Jan 2013 12:11 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/21172

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