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Is the dramatic surface warming observed in the Antarctic Peninsula also present throughout the troposphere?

Marshall, Gareth J.. 2001 Is the dramatic surface warming observed in the Antarctic Peninsula also present throughout the troposphere? In: Sixth Conference on Polar Meteorology and Oceanography, San Diego, 13-18 May. 33-36. (Unpublished)

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Abstract/Summary

Meteorological surface observations from the Antarctic Peninsula began in the mid-1940s. The most reliable long-term (~50 years) temperature record from this region has been obtained from Faraday station on the western side of the Peninsula (Fig. 1). The annual surface temperature trend for the 50-years from 1951- 2000 is +0 .0562 ± 0.0429°C a"', which is significant at the 1% level. Hansen et al. (1999) demonstrated that from 1950-98 the Peninsula underwent the greatest warming anywhere in the Southern Hemisphere, which was of a similar magnitude to the largest coincident global temperature rises, observed in regions of the Arctic (cf. their Plate 4a) . Seasonally, the greatest warming at Faraday has occurred during the austral winter (JJA) - +0.1089 ± 0.0880°C ã' - and has been linked to a decrease in winter sea-ice extent in the Bellingshausen Sea west of the Peninsula (Jacobs and Comiso 1997; King and Harangozo 1998), with resultant changes in the regional marine ecosystem (Fraser et a(. 1992). However, it is the smaller summer (DJF) temperature increase of +0 .0244 ± 0.0168°C ã' that is principally responsible for the widely publicized disintegration of many ice shelves fringing the northern Peninsula (Vaughan and Doake 1996).

Item Type: Publication - Conference Item (Paper)
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Antarctic Science in the Global Context (2000-2005) > Antarctic Climate Processes
Date made live: 22 Oct 2012 08:44
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/20066

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