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The likely impact of elevated [CO2], nitrogen deposition, increased temperature and management on carbon sequestration in temperate and boreal forest ecosystems: a literature review.

Hyvönen, Ritta; Agren, Goran I.; Linder, Sune; Persson, Tryggve; Cotrufo, M. Francesca; Ekblad, Alf; Freeman, Michael; Grelle, Achim; Janssens, Ivan A.; Jarvis, Paul G.; Kellomäki, Seppo; Lindroth, Anders; Loustau, Denis; Lundmark, Tornas; Norby, Richard J.; Oren, Rarn; Pilegaard, Kim; Ryan, Michael G.; Sigurdsson, Bjarni D.; Strömgren, Monika; Van Oijen, Marcel; Wallin, Goran. 2007 The likely impact of elevated [CO2], nitrogen deposition, increased temperature and management on carbon sequestration in temperate and boreal forest ecosystems: a literature review. New Phytologist, 173 (3). 463-480. 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01967.x

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Abstract/Summary

Temperate and boreal forest ecosystems contain a large part of the carbon stored on land, in the form of both biomass and soil organic matter. Increasing atmospheric [CO2], increasing temperature, elevated nitrogen deposition and intensified management will change this C store. Well documented single-factor responses of net primary production are: higher photosynthetic rate (the main [CO2] response); increasing length of growing season (the main temperature response); and higher leaf-area index (the main N deposition and partly [CO2] response). Soil organic matter will increase with increasing litter input, although priming may decrease the soil C stock initially, but litter quality effects should be minimal (response to [CO2], N deposition, and temperature); will decrease because of increasing temperature; and will increase because of retardation of decomposition with N deposition, although the rate of decomposition of high-quality litter can be increased and that of low-quality litter decreased. Single-factor responses can be misleading because of interactions between factors, in particular those between N and other factors, and indirect effects such as increased N availability from temperature-induced decomposition. In the long term the strength of feedbacks, for example the increasing demand for N from increased growth, will dominate over short-term responses to single factors. However, management has considerable potential for controlling the C store.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1111/j.1469-8137.2007.01967.x
Programmes: CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biogeochemistry > CC01B Land-surface Feedbacks in the Climate System
CEH Sections: Billett
ISSN: 0028-646X
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: Open access paper. Please follow Official URL link to access full-text.
Additional Keywords: carbon balance, carbon dioxide (CO2), climate change, fertilization, global warming.
NORA Subject Terms: Ecology and Environment
Atmospheric Sciences
Date made live: 10 Jan 2008 15:16
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1962

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