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Chrono- and lithostratigraphy of a Mesozoic–Tertiary fore- to intra-arc basin: Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula

Riley, Teal R.; Flowerdew, Michael J.; Whitehouse, Martin J.. 2012 Chrono- and lithostratigraphy of a Mesozoic–Tertiary fore- to intra-arc basin: Adelaide Island, Antarctic Peninsula. Geological Magazine, 149 (5). 768-782. 10.1017/S0016756811001002

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Abstract/Summary

The Mesozoic fore-arc of the Antarctic Peninsula is exposed along its west coast. On Adelaide Island, a 2–3 km succession of turbiditic coarse sandstones and volcanic rocks is exposed. Four U–Pb (zircon) ages are presented here that, in combination with a new stratigraphy, have permitted a robust chrono- and lithostratigraphy to be constructed, which in turn has allowed tentative correlations to be made with the Fossil Bluff Group of Alexander Island, where the ‘type’ fore-arc sequences are described. The lithostratigraphy of Adelaide Island includes the definition of five volcanic/sedimentary formations. The oldest formation is the Buchia Buttress Formation (149.5 ± 1.6 Ma) and is correlated with the Himalia Ridge Formation of Alexander Island. The sandstone–conglomerate dominated succession of the Milestone Bluff Formation (113.9 ± 1.2 Ma) is tentatively correlated with the Pluto Glacier Formation of Alexander Island. Three dominantly volcanic formations are recognized on Adelaide Island, akin to the volcanic rocks of the Alexander Island Volcanic Group; the Mount Liotard Formation is formed of 2 km of basaltic andesite lavas, whilst the Bond Nunatak Formation is also dominated by basaltic andesite lavas, but interbedded with volcaniclastic rocks. The Reptile Ridge Formation has been dated at 67.6 ± 0.7 Ma and is characterized by hydrothermally altered rhyolitic crystal-lithic tuffs. Tentative correlations between Adelaide Island and Alexander Island preclude the two areas forming part of distinct terranes as has been suggested previously, and a proximal source for volcaniclastic sediments also indicates an exotic terrane origin is unlikely.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1017/S0016756811001002
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Polar Science for Planet Earth (2009 - ) > Environmental Change and Evolution
ISSN: 0016-7568
Additional Keywords: Fore-arc, Gondwana, Subduction, Chronostratigraphy, Antarctica, Jurassic, Cretaceous
NORA Subject Terms: Earth Sciences
Date made live: 13 Sep 2012 09:13
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/19567

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