nerc.ac.uk

Evidence against recent climate-induced destabilisation of soil carbon from 14C analysis of riverine dissolved organic matter

Evans, Chris D.; Freeman, Chris; Cork, Lorna G.; Thomas, David N.; Reynolds, Brian; Billett, Michael F.; Garnett, Mark H.; Norris, David. 2007 Evidence against recent climate-induced destabilisation of soil carbon from 14C analysis of riverine dissolved organic matter. Geophysical Research Letters, 34, L07407. 10.1029/2007GL029431

Before downloading, please read NORA policies.
[img]
Preview
Text
N001768PP.pdf

Download (446kB)

Abstract/Summary

The stability of global soil carbon (C) represents a major uncertainty in forecasting future climate change. In the UK, substantial soil C losses have been reported, while at the same time dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations in upland waters have increased, suggesting that soil C stocks may be destabilising in response to climate change. To investigate the link between soil carbon and DOC at a range of sites, soil organic matter, soilwater and streamwater DOC were analysed for radiocarbon (14C). DOC exported from C-rich landscapes appears younger than the soil C itself, much of it comprising C assimilated post-1950s. DOC from more intensively managed, C-poor soils is older, in some cases >100 years. Results appear consistent with soil C destabilisation in farmed landscapes, but not in peatlands. Reported C losses may to a significant extent be explained by mechanisms other than climate change, e.g. recovery from acidification in peatlands, and agricultural intensification in managed systems.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1029/2007GL029431
Programmes: CEH Programmes pre-2009 publications > Biogeochemistry
CEH Sections: Billett (to 30 Nov 2013)
Emmett
ISSN: 0094-8276
Additional Keywords: soil carbon, DOC, radiocarbon, Euro-limpacs deliverable no. 157, Task 5.2
NORA Subject Terms: Agriculture and Soil Science
Ecology and Environment
Chemistry
Date made live: 19 Dec 2007 15:51
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/1768

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item

Document Downloads

More statistics for this item...