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Inferring bubble populations in intertidal sediments from attenuation and scattering measurements

Mantouka, A.; Leighton, T.G.; Best, A.I.; Dix, J.K.; White, P.R.. 2009 Inferring bubble populations in intertidal sediments from attenuation and scattering measurements. In: Papdakis, J.S.; Bjorno, L., (eds.) Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Underwater Acoustic Measurements, Technologies and Results. Heraklion, Greece, Institute of Applied & Computational Mathematics (IACM), 733-738.

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Abstract/Summary

The presence of gas and gas bubbles, and their effects on the geoacoustic properties of sediments, have being the topics of many investigations. In the case of cohesive gassy sediments, the shape of the gas in the host medium has also been seen as important. In many cases the gas in muds appears to form cracks or take the form of oblate spheroids. However to make theory of the acoustic interactions tractable, they are often assumed to be spherical. In this paper, acoustic propagation and backscattering measurements are interpreted in order to infer shape information of gas inclusions (e.g. slabs, cracks or spheroids) The measurements were carried out at intertidal sites on the South coast of England. The bubble population was estimated from backscattering measurements using a nonlinear bubble dynamics inversion method. This method assumes the presence of spherical bubbles only and uses a 'mixed-frequency' insonification which limits ambiguities in interpretation of the measurements. Then the computed bubble population is converted to attenuation values. These attenuation values are compared to attenuation values obtained from the propagation measurements in order to compare the two methods and speculate the sphericity of the bubbles present.

Item Type: Publication - Book Section
Date made live: 02 Feb 2010 +0 (UTC)
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/171444

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