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Scrutinizing the impact of CCS communication on opinion quality : focus group discussions versus Information-Choice Questionnaires : results from experimental research in six countries

Daamen, Dancker D.L.; Terwel, Bart W.; ter Mors, Emma; Reiner, David M.; Schumann, Diana; Anghel, Sorin; Boulouta, Ioanna; Cismaru, Diana M.; Constantine, Carmencita; de Jager, Chris C.H.; Dudu, Alexandra; Firth, Rebecca M.; Gemeni, Vassiliki; Hendriks, Chris; Koukouzas, Nikolaos; Markos, Angelos; Naess, Robert; Nihfidov, Oana C.; Pietzner, Katja; Samoila, Irene R.; Sava, Constantin S.; Stephenson, Mike H.; Tomescu, Claudia E.; Torvatin, Hans Y.; Tvedt, Sturle D.; Vallentin, Daniel; West, Julia M.; Ziogou, Fotini. 2011 Scrutinizing the impact of CCS communication on opinion quality : focus group discussions versus Information-Choice Questionnaires : results from experimental research in six countries. Energy Procedia, 4. 6182-6187. 10.1016/j.egypro.2011.02.629

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Abstract/Summary

Previous research has shown that public knowledge and awareness of carbon dioxide capture and storage (CCS) is very limited. As a result, traditional surveys designed to collect public opinions about CCS do in fact assess so-called pseudo opinions. Pseudo-opinions are of very low quality because they are mostly unstable and inconsistent. Therefore, they are not predictive for actual and future public support for or opposition against CCS. As compared to pseudo opinions, opinions expressed after the public has been provided with factual information about CCS are likely to be of higher quality. Focus group discussions and Information-Choice Questionnaires (ICQs) are two research techniques frequently used in the CCS literature that aim to collect such informed public opinions. In this study, we examined which of these two research technique leads to the highest quality opinions (i.e., to opinions that are consistent, stable, and that people are confident about). Our results showed that ICQs yielded higher-quality opinions than focus group discussions. Practical implications and recommendations are discussed.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.egypro.2011.02.629
Programmes: BGS Programmes 2010 > Energy Science
Date made live: 17 Feb 2012 13:33
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/16828

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