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The impact of sea level rise and climate change on inshore wave climate: a case study for East Anglia (UK)

Chini, Nicolas; Stansby, Peter; Leake, James; Wolf, Judith; Roberts-Jones, Jonah; Lowe, Jason. 2010 The impact of sea level rise and climate change on inshore wave climate: a case study for East Anglia (UK). Coastal Engineering, 57 (11-12), November-December. 973-984. 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2010.05.009

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Abstract/Summary

In coastal areas, offshore wave propagation towards the shore is influenced by water depth variations, due to sea bed bathymetry, tides and surges. Considering implications of climate change both on atmospheric forcing and sea level rise, a simple methodology involving numerical modelling is implemented to compute inshore waves from 1960 to 2099. Simulations take into account five scenarios of linear sea level rise and one climatic scenario for storm surges and offshore waves. The methodology is applied to the East Anglia coast (UK). Extreme event analysis is performed to estimate climate change implication on inshore waves and the occurrence of extreme events. It is shown, for this coastal region, that wave statistics are sensitive to the trend in sea level rise, and that the climate change scenario leads to a significant increase of extreme wave heights in the northern part of the domain. For nearshore points, the increase of the mean sea level alters not only extreme wave heights but also the frequency of occurrence of extreme wave conditions

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1016/j.coastaleng.2010.05.009
Programmes: Oceans 2025 > Climate, ocean circulation and sea level
ISSN: 0378-3839
Additional Information. Not used in RCUK Gateway to Research.: Chini, Nicolas Stansby, Peter Leake, James Wolf, Judith Roberts-Jones, Jonah Lowe, Jason Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research ; Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council [EP/F020511/1]; DEFRA/EA Joint Research Programme on Flood and Coastal Defence, UKWIR, OPW (Ireland) ; Rivers Agency (Northern Ireland) ; DECC [(DECC) GA01101]; MoD [(MoD) CBC/2B/0417_Annex C5]; Defra This work was funded through the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research and contributes to the Coastal Simulator programme led by Professor Robert Nicholls (Southampton University). It also contributes to the Flood Risk Management Research Consortium. The FRMRC is supported by grant EP/F020511/1 from the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council, in partnership with the DEFRA/EA Joint Research Programme on Flood and Coastal Defence, UKWIR, OPW (Ireland) and the Rivers Agency (Northern Ireland). Jason Lowe was supported by the Joint DECC and MoD Integrated Climate Programme - (DECC) GA01101, (MoD) CBC/2B/0417_Annex C5 and Defra. Their financial support is gratefully acknowledged. We would also like to acknowledge Gerard Goasguen (CETMEF) for making the ANEMOC dataset available, Kevin Horsburgh (POL) for providing the results from CS3X model driven with ERA-40 reanalysis, and the British Oceanographic Data Centre for field wave records.
Additional Keywords: SIGNIFICANT WAVE HEIGHT; STORM SURGES; CLIMATE CHANGE; EXTREME VALUE DISTRIBUTION; MODELS; EROSION; EXTREMES
NORA Subject Terms: Marine Sciences
Date made live: 24 Jun 2011 14:23
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/13901

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