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Variability of competition at scales of 10(1), 10(3), 10(5), and 10(6) m: encrusting arctic community patterns

Barnes, D. K. A.; Kuklinski, P.. 2004 Variability of competition at scales of 10(1), 10(3), 10(5), and 10(6) m: encrusting arctic community patterns. Marine Biology, 145 (2). 361-372. 10.1007/s00227-004-1320-z

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Abstract/Summary

Variability in interference competition was studied in benthic marine communities of the arctic and subarctic Atlantic intertidal and shallow subtidal zones. We sampled multiple square-metre quadrats at distances of 10(1). 10(3) and 10(5) m apart around the high polar island of Spitsbergen (Svalbard Archipelago). We also took some similar samples in Iceland and in the Faeroe Islands (106 in apart from Spitsbergen samples). Encrusting fauna were present on high arctic intertidal rocks but we only found competitive interactions on subtidal substrata. On subarctic Icelandic and Faeroese shores, in contrast, spatial competition was common even in the intertidal zone. Analysis of variance of competition intensity data (numbers of interactions per area) revealed multiple factors to be significant Influences explaining variability. Amongst the 10(1)-, 10(3) -, and 10(5)-m spatial scales, only the largest emerged as a significant term. Whether intra- or interspecific competition dominated the types of interactions varied greatly between sites: 21-97% of competition was intraspecific. The proportion of competitive encounters resulting in a decided outcome (i.e. a win for one competitor and a loss for the other. rather than a tie or standoff between them) showed little variability at any scale. All the values of competition transitivity (how hierarchical a pecking order is) were very high compared to values reported in the literature from any other (polar or non-polar) locality. Variability in this measure was generally < 10% across scales. We conclude from our data that great care must be taken in interpreting patterns of competition between similar taxa in large-scale space or time. Not only did most aspects of competition in our study communities vary significantly at the 10(5)-m scale but different aspects of competition varied at different scales and by hugely different amounts.

Item Type: Publication - Article
Digital Object Identifier (DOI): 10.1007/s00227-004-1320-z
Programmes: BAS Programmes > Antarctic Science in the Global Context (2000-2005) > Life at the Edge - Stresses and Thresholds
ISSN: 0025-3162
NORA Subject Terms: Marine Sciences
Zoology
Ecology and Environment
Date made live: 11 Jan 2012 14:37
URI: http://nora.nerc.ac.uk/id/eprint/12101

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